Hashimoto Diet Food List (PDF)

Hashimoto Diet Food List – Overview

Hashimoto thyroiditis, also renowned as Hashimoto’s disease, is one of the most common thyroid diseases in the U.S as well as other developed countries.

Even when diagnosed and treated with medicine, its symptoms may substantially affect the quality of life.

Research shows that diet and lifestyle modifications may considerably improve symptoms in addition to basic medication.

People with Hashimoto’s disease respond differently to treatment, so an individualized approach for this condition is vital.

This review will look at how diet and lifestyle affect Hashimoto’s disease, what you can and can’t eat when you have the disease, and supplements for your diet.

How Do Diet and Lifestyle Affect Hashimoto?

Diet and lifestyle play a crucial role in managing Hashimoto’s disease as many people discover that their symptoms continue even with medication.

What’s more, people who exhibit symptoms aren’t given medicine unless they have varying hormone levels.

In addition, studies suggest that inflammation may be a driving cause behind the wide variety of Hashimoto’s symptoms.

Diet and lifestyle modifications likewise are vital in reducing the risk of other diseases because people with Hashimoto’s disease have a higher chance of contracting autoimmune conditions, diabetes, high cholesterol, and obesity.

Studies also show that eliminating certain foods, making lifestyle changes, and taking supplements may substantially improve quality of life and symptoms.

What’s more, these changes may help reduce inflammation, prevent or slow down thyroid damage caused by elevated antibodies and manage blood sugar, body weight, and cholesterol.

Foods You Can Eat On the Hashimoto Diet

Hashimoto Diet Food List

Hashimoto Diet Food List – Foods You Can Eat On the Hashimoto Diet

If you have Hashimoto’s disease, a nutrient-dense diet may help lessen the severity of your symptoms and boost your overall wellbeing. Try and eat the following foods:

  1. Animal protein: Chicken, cod, eggs, salmon, shrimp, turkey, etc.
  2. Beans: Black beans, chickpeas, lentils, etc.
  3. Beverages: sparkling water, water, unsweetened coffee or tea, etc.
  4. Condiments, herbs, and spices: Apple cider vinegar, basil, black pepper, honey, lemon juice, paprika, rosemary, saffron, salsa, tahini, turmeric, etc.
  5. Dairy and non-dairy substitutes: Almond milk, cashew milk, coconut milk, coconut yogurt, goat cheese, full-fat unsweetened yogurt, etc. (should be fortified with calcium).
  6. Fruits: Apples, bananas, berries, citrus fruits, peaches, pears, pineapple, etc.
  7. Gluten-free whole grains: Brown rice, brown rice pasts, quinoa, rolled oats, etc.
  8. Healthy fats and oils: avocado, avocado oil, coconut, coconut oil, coconut yogurt, full-fat yogurt, olive oil, unsweetened coconut flakes, etc.
  9. Non-starchy vegetables: artichokes, arugula, asparagus, beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, carrots, mushrooms, peppers, zucchini, etc.
  10. Nuts, nut butter, and seeds: Almonds, almond butter, cashews, macadamia nuts, natural peanut butter, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, etc.
  11. Starchy vegetables: acorn, butternut squash, peas, potatoes, sweet potatoes, etc.

Remember that some people with Hashimoto’s disease stay away from a couple of foods mentioned above, such as dairy. Thus, it’s crucial to experiment to find out what works for you.

Foods Not To Eat on the Hashimoto Diet

Hashimoto Diet Food List

Hashimoto Diet Food List – Foods Not To Eat on the Hashimoto Diet

Restricting the following foods may help improve your wellbeing and reduce symptoms:

  1. Added sugars and sweets: Cakes, candy, cookies, energy drinks, soda, table sugar, etc.
  2. Fast food and fried food: French fries, fried chicken, hot dogs, sausages, etc.
  3. Gluten grains and foods: Barley, bread, crackers, rye, wheat, etc.
  4. Highly processed foods and meats: Bacon, frozen dinners, margarine, sausages, etc.
  5. Refined grains: Bagels, white bread, white flour tortillas, white bread, etc.

Some healthcare professionals recommend that people with Hashimoto’s disease avoid dairy, soy products, and even grains.

However, although these suggestions can help many people, it’s crucial to experiment with your diet to find out what works for you.

Working with a nutritionist specializing in autoimmune ailments such as Hashimoto’s disease can help you narrow down potentially challenging foods and develop an eating pattern or timetable that will help you be at your best.

Helpful Supplements for the Hashimoto Diet

Some supplements can help reduce inflammation and thyroid antibodies in persons with Hashimoto’s disease.

In addition, those with this condition are more likely to have a nutrient deficiency, so supplementing might be necessary.

Some of the beneficial supplements for this disease include:

Complex Vitamin B

Hashimoto Diet Food List

Hashimoto Diet Food List – Complex Vitamin B

Persons with Hashimoto’s disease tend to be low in Vitamin B12. Consuming a top-notch B complex vitamin enhances vitamin B12 levels and other vital B vitamins as well.

Curcumin

Hashimoto Diet Food List

Hashimoto Diet Food List – Curcumin

Animal and human research has shown that Curcumin can help protect the thyroid. What’s more, it can help treat autoimmune diseases overall.

Iron

Hashimoto Diet Food List

Hashimoto Diet Food List – Iron

Individuals with Hashimoto’s disease have a higher likelihood of contracting anemia. Therefore, iron supplements will be needed to correct this deficiency.

Magnesium

Hashimoto Diet Food List

Hashimoto Diet Food List – Magnesium

Low magnesium levels are linked to an increased risk of Hashimoto’s disease and higher thyroid antibodies. Plus, treating magnesium deficiencies can improve thyroid disease symptoms.

Other Supplements

Hashimoto Diet Food List

Hashimoto Diet Food List – Other Supplements

Supplements such as alpha-lipoic acid and fish oil can aid people with Hashimoto’s disease.

Selenium

Hashimoto Diet Food List

Hashimoto Diet Food List – Selenium

Research shows that consuming 200 mcg of selenium per day may help cut TPO (antithyroid peroxidase) antibodies and boost health in persons with Hashimoto’s disease.

Vitamin D

Persons with Hashimoto’s disease have been seen to have substantially lower levels of this vitamin compared to the general population.

What’s more, research connects low vitamin D levels to the severity of Hashimoto’s disease.

Zinc

Zinc is vital for thyroid function. Studies suggest that 30 mg of this mineral each day can boost thyroid function in persons with hypothyroidism when used solely or alongside selenium.

Keep in mind that supplementing with massive iodine doses in the absence of an iodine deficiency may cause adverse effects to those with Hashimoto’s disease.

Therefore, you shouldn’t consume massive amounts of iodine unless a physician has directed you to do so.

Lifestyle Changes for the Hashimoto Diet

Getting adequate sleep, practicing self-care, and reducing stress are extremely crucial for persons with Hashimoto’s disease.

Studies show that participating in stress-reduction practices helps improve the overall quality of life, reduces anxiety and depression, and lowers thyroid antibodies in women with Hashimoto’s disease.

Allowing your body to rest when you feel fatigued is vital as well.

What’s more, you should take thyroid medication on an empty stomach at least 30 minutes before breakfast or at least 3 hours after supper for maximum absorption.

Final Thought

Hashimoto’s disease is a typical autoimmune condition that affects the thyroid. It brings about numerous symptoms that may endure even after you take medication.

However, dietary and lifestyle changes can significantly reduce symptoms and boost your overall health.

Foods to Eat On The Hashimoto Diet
Animal protein: Chicken, cod, eggs, salmon, shrimp, turkey, etc.
Beans: Black beans, chickpeas, lentils, etc.
Beverages: sparkling water, water, unsweetened coffee or tea, etc.
Condiments, herbs, and spices: Apple cider vinegar, basil, black pepper, honey, lemon juice, paprika, rosemary, saffron, salsa, tahini, turmeric, etc.
Dairy and non-dairy substitutes: Almond milk, cashew milk, coconut milk, coconut yogurt, goat cheese, full-fat unsweetened yogurt, etc. (should be fortified with calcium).
Fruits: Apples, bananas, berries, citrus fruits, peaches, pears, pineapple, etc.
Gluten-free whole grains: Brown rice, brown rice pasts, quinoa, rolled oats, etc.
Healthy fats and oils: avocado, avocado oil, coconut, coconut oil, coconut yogurt, full-fat yogurt, olive oil, unsweetened coconut flakes, etc.
Non-starchy vegetables: artichokes, arugula, asparagus, beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, carrots, mushrooms, peppers, zucchini, etc.
Nuts, nut butter, and seeds: Almonds, almond butter, cashews, macadamia nuts, natural peanut butter, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, etc.
Starchy vegetables: acorn, butternut squash, peas, potatoes, sweet potatoes, etc.
Supplements You Can Take on The Hashimoto Diet
Complex Vitamin B
Curcumin
Iron
Magnesium
Other Supplements
Selenium
Vitamin D
Zinc

See Also

Pancreatitis Diet Food List (Printable)

Vertical Diet Meal Plan with Food List

Liquid Diet Food List

Diabetic Diet Food List (With Tables)

HCG Diet Food List

1200 Calorie Diet Food List

Elimination Diet Food List

Ulcer Diet Food List

Keto Cycle Diet