Vitamin A Foods List and Recommended Intake | 48 Foods With Vitamin D

Vitamin A Foods List

When most people hear about vitamin A, the first thought that comes to their mind is that you get it from eating carrots.

They also associate the nutrient with good eyesight. However, there is more to vitamin A than just enhancing good vision and eating carrots for the nutrients. 

The following article gives an overview of vitamin A, its benefits, foods, and deficiency symptoms.

What Is vitamin A?

Vitamin A Food List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake

Vitamin A Foods List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake – What Is vitamin A?

Dietary vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin that is important for maintaining healthy vision and healthy skin, bones, and other tissues in the body.

Vitamin A works as an antioxidant to prevent cell damage, but it also has many additional applications. There are two categories of vitamin A. 

Preformed vitamin A, also known as retinol, is abundant in animal products, while pro-vitamin A is present in plant-based meals.

The most prevalent kind of pro-vitamin A is beta-carotene, a carotenoid found in brightly colored foods and responsible for producing dark pigments in plants.

5 Health Benefits Of Vitamin A

Vitamin A Foods List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake

Vitamin A Foods List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake – Health Benefits Of Vitamin A

The following are some of the scientifically proven health benefits of vitamin A.

1. Sustains Eye Health

A lack of vitamin A can lead to blurry sight and deterioration of night vision, as it builds pigments in the eye that allow you to see color in the dark.

2. Helps Build A More Robust Immune System

The immune system relies on vitamin A to create, maintain, and strengthen the epithelial and mucous membranes that line most organs.  

3. Supports The Improved Function Of The Body Organs

When taken as directed, vitamin A could aid in improved function of the heart, lungs, and kidneys by encouraging the formation of healthy cells and tissues.

4. Treatment And Reduction Of Acne

Retinol, a type of vitamin A available as prescribed medication or in low OTC dosage, is one of the most effective topical acne remedies.

5. It Promotes Healthy Gestation

To ensure a healthy pregnancy, pregnant women must get an adequate amount of vitamin A in their diets.

How Much Vitamin A Is Necessary for a Healthy Body?

Vitamin A requirements vary from one person to the next depending on age, sex, lactating, or pregnancy. The recommended intakes are:

Age Recommended Intake (MCG)

Birth–6 months 400

7–12 months 500

1–3 years 300

4–8 years 400

9–13 years 600

Males 14+ 900

Females 14+ 700

Pregnant teens 750

Pregnant adults 770

Breastfeeding teens 1,200

Breastfeeding adults 1,300

Vitamin A Food List

The following are the food sources rich in vitamin A.

Plant-Based

Vitamin A Food List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake

Vitamin A Food List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake – Plant-Based

Provitamin A is present in leafy greens and a few other vegetables and is critical for the immune system, eyesight, certain organ functions, and the reproductive system.

When it comes to vitamin A-rich meals, the rule of thumb is to choose brightly colored veggies. Those rich in the nutrient are:

  • Asparagus                  
  • Broccoli                                 
  • Carrots                                              
  • Celery
  • Collard greens
  • Kale
  • Okra
  • Romaine lettuce
  • Spinach                                 
  • Sweet potatoes                      
  • Sweet red pepper
  • Swiss chard
  • Turnip greens
  • Winter and summer squash    
  • Pistachio nuts             
  • Baked beans               
  • Black-eyed peas
  • Pumpkin pie
  • Tomato Juice              

Fruits

Vitamin A Food List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake

Vitamin A Foods List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake – Fruits

When comparing the quantity of provitamin A found in veggies and fruits, vegetables have a substantially higher concentration. Nonetheless, several fruits are high in vitamin A, such as:

  • Cantaloupe                 
  • Mango
  • Dried Apricots           
  • Grapefruit
  • Watermelon
  • Papaya
  • Guava
  • Goji Berries
  • Tangerine
  • Nectarine
  • Olives
  • Passion fruit
  • Plums
  • Peach
  • Blackberry
  • Avocado
  • Orange

Vitamin A Animal Sources

Vitamin A Food List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake

Vitamin A Foods List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake – Vitamin A Animal Sources

Several micronutrients that are hard to gain in sufficient quantities from plant-based diets are available in animal-based sources of nutrition.

Due to the abundance of vitamin A-rich food sources, it is simple to meet your daily nutrient requirements through your diet.

These foods contain some of the highest concentrations of dietary vitamin A available on the market.

  • Salmon           
  • Tuna
  • Oyster 
  • Mackerel 
  • Milk 
  • Beef liver
  • Butter
  • Ghee 
  • Cheese 
  • Herring
  • Eggs
  • Fortified dairy products

Supplements

Vitamin A Food List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake

Vitamin A Foods List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake – Supplements

Vitamin A supplements are available for those who find it challenging to obtain all of the vitamin A they require through animal-based, plant-based, and fortified diets alone.

However, you will need to consult with your doctor about the appropriate dosage.

What Are The Common Vitamin A Deficiency Symptoms?

The severity of vitamin A insufficiency symptoms varies from person to person, with some experiencing more severe symptoms than do.

The following are some of the possible signs that people may encounter:

1. Vision-Related Issues

People deficient in vitamin A are more likely to experience vision problems. The eyes may become extremely dry at first, which could cause damage to the cornea and retina.

Vitamin A deficiency can also cause night blindness; resulting in poor vision when light is low, which eventually progresses to complete nighttime blindness for the individual.

It is possible that in extreme situations, the eye may continue to dry out, and tissues will accumulate in the corneal layer. As a result, the cornea may get cloudy, develop lesions, or even become destroyed.

2. Recurrent Infections

Vitamin A is essential for the proper functioning of the immune system.

When a person is deficient in vitamin A, they may encounter more recurrent infections because they are unable to fight off these illnesses as effectively.

3. Skin Problems

Dryness, irritation, and flaking are some of the skin symptoms that some persons with vitamin A insufficiency experience. Some people may also encounter similar problems with their hair and scalp.

4. Conception Issues

Vitamin A is essential in the process of reproduction, and a deficiency can lead to infertility and trouble having a child in some cases.

5. Stunted Growth

Vitamin A is essential in the development of healthy cells. Not getting enough of this vital vitamin can cause delayed or stunted growth. It can also cause sluggish bone development in youngsters.

Not getting enough of this vital vitamin can cause delayed and stunted growth. It can also cause sluggish bone development in youngsters.

Who Is More Prone To Vitamin A Deficiency?

Vitamin A Food List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake

Vitamin A Foods List, Benefits, and Recommended Intake – Who Is More Prone To Vitamin A Deficiency?

Some people, such as the following, maybe more at risk of vitamin A insufficiency than others may:

  • Children under the age of five, especially in developing countries
  • Infants born prematurely
  • Pregnant or breastfeeding women

It is also possible to develop a secondary deficiency in those who have underlying conditions that interfere with the body’s capacity to utilize vitamin A, such as those who have:

  • Blockage of the bile duct
  • Celiac disease – a digestive disorder that affects the small intestine
  • Cirrhosis
  • Cystic fibrosis – a disease that affects the lungs
  • Diarrhea for an extended period
  • Duodenal bypass 

Final Thoughts

Nutritional A is essential for the healthy development and function of many organs and systems in the body, including the eyes, skin, and immune system.

It occurs naturally in various foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and fish, among others. 

As an oral supplement, vitamin A is most beneficial to persons who have a poor or constrained diet and those who have a problem such as pancreatitis, eye problems, or measles. 

If you are taking vitamin A for its antioxidant effects, consider that the supplement may not offer similar properties as naturally occurring antioxidants found in food and other sources.

Printable Vitamin A Food List (PDF)

Vitamin A Food List
Asparagus                  
Broccoli                                 
Carrots                                              
Celery
Collard greens
Kale
Okra
Romaine lettuce
Spinach                                 
Sweet potatoes                      
Sweet red pepper
Swiss chard
Turnip greens
Winter and summer squash    
Pistachio nuts             
Baked beans               
Black-eyed peas
Pumpkin pie
Tomato Juice              
Cantaloupe                 
Mango
Dried Apricots           
Grapefruit
 Watermelon
Papaya
Guava
 Goji Berries
Tangerine
Nectarine
Olives
Passion fruit
Plums
Peach
Blackberry
Avocado
Orange
Salmon           
Tuna
Oyster 
Mackerel 
Milk 
Beef liver
Butter
 Ghee 
Cheese 
Herring
Eggs
Fortified dairy products
Supplements

See Also

Vitamin C Food List

Vitamin D Food List

Vitamin K Food List

Vitamin B12 Food List

Vitamin B Food List

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