Pegan Diet Food List (4 Category)

Pegan Diet Food List

When you merge the paleo and vegan diets, what do you have? A trendy eating routine is known as the pegan diet.

Dr. Mark Hyman first came up with the name on his blog in 2014, but the philosophy has gathered pace recently.

Pinterest has revealed that interest in this diet rose by an astonishing 337% in the past year, and this trend is expected to continue.

So if you think that being on paleo and vegan regimens at the same time sounds impossible, you’re not alone.

Despite its name, this diet is quite exclusive and comprises its own rules. As a matter of fact, by itself, the pegan diet is less restrictive than the paleo or vegan diets.

The pegan diet places prominence on fruits and vegetables as well as intake of moderate amounts of meat, nuts, seeds, some legumes, and specific fish.

Heavily processed grains, oils, and sugars are discouraged, although acceptable in moderate amounts.

The pegan diet is not meant to be a standard short-term diet. Instead, it endeavors to be more sustainable so that users can follow it over the long term.

Foods to Eat On a Pegan Diet

1. Legumes and Whole Grains

Pegan Diet Food List

Pegan Diet Food List – Legumes and Whole Grains

Although most legumes and whole grains are discouraged on this diet because they can increase blood sugar, some gluten-free legumes and whole grains are allowed.

However, you shouldn’t take more than one cup (75 grams) of legumes per day. In addition, you shouldn’t take more than half a cup (125 grams) of whole grain per serving.

Some of the legumes and whole grains you can take include:

  1. Legumes: Black beans, chickpeas, green beans, lentils, and pinto beans.
  2. Whole grains: Amaranth, black rice, millet, oats, teff, and quinoa.

Makes sure you further restrict yourself from consuming legumes and whole grains if you have diabetes or any other condition that can lead to poor blood sugar control.

2. Non-Processed Fats

Pegan Diet Food List

Pegan Diet Food List – Non-Processed Fats

While on the pegan diet, you should tale healthy fats from certain sources such as

  1. Avocado and olives: You can use avocado and cold-pressed olive oil.
  2. Coconut: You can take unrefined coconut oil.
  3. Nuts: You can take all nuts such as almonds and cashews except peanuts.
  4. Omega-3s: Particularly those from low-mercury algae or fish.
  5. Seeds: Take all seed oils except the processed ones.

3. Plants

Pegan Diet Food List

Pegan Diet Food List – Plants

Fruits and vegetables are the primary food group for the pegan diet and should comprise about 75% of your entire intake.

In addition, you can take low glycemic fruits such as avocados, blackberries, blueberries, lemon, lime, and raspberries.

In addition, you can take non-starchy vegetables to lower your blood sugar response.

Some of the vegetables you can take include bell peppers, broccoli, butter lettuce, cauliflower, celery, collard greens, kale, and mushrooms.

Moderate amounts of high glycemic fruits and starchy vegetables can be allowed for users who have already achieved healthy blood sugar control before commencing the diet.

See Also Vegan Keto Diet

4. Proteins

Pegan Diet Food List

Pegan Diet Food List – Proteins

Although the pegan diet mainly emphasizes plant-based foods, adequate animal protein intake is still recommended.

However, remember that since 75% of this diet comprises fruits and vegetables, only about 25% is left for animal-based proteins.

As such, you’ll take less meat than you would on a standard paleo diet but still more than any vegan diet.

The pegan diet rejects eating conventionally farmed eggs or meat. Instead, it emphasizes grass-fed sources of beef, lamb, pork, poultry, and whole eggs.

It also recommends fish intake, especially those with low mercury content, such as sardines and wild salmon.

5. Foods to Avoid on a Pegan Diet

The pegan diet is more versatile compared to the paleo and vegan diets because it allows for the occasional consumption of almost all foods.

That said, a couple of foods and food groups are strongly discouraged. Some of these foods are considered detrimental, while others are deemed to be okay, depending on whom you ask.

Some of the foods you should avoid on the pegan diet include:

Pegan Diet Food List

Pegan Diet Food List – Foods to avoid

  1. Dairy: Cheese, cow milk, and yogurt are strongly discouraged. However, dairy products made from goat or sheep milk are allowed in small portions.
  2. Food additives: Flavoring, preservatives, and synthetic coloring should be avoided.
  3. Gluten: All grains with gluten are strongly discouraged.
  4. Gluten-free grains: Even grains that don’t have gluten are not recommended. However, small portions of gluten-free whole grains are allowed occasionally.
  5. Legumes: Most legumes are not recommended because they can increase blood sugar levels. However, non-starch legumes such as green beans and lentils are allowed.
  6. Refines oils: Refined oils such as canola, corn, palm, soybean, and sunflower oil are strongly discouraged because they contain some amount of cholesterol.
  7. Sugar: Any kind of sugar, whether refined or not, is strongly discouraged.

Pros and Cons of the Pegan Diet

Pros

Flexibility

Perhaps the most significant benefit of the pegan diet is that it’s more flexible than the paleo and vegan diets.

The pegan diet limits legumes, but those who don’t struggle to control their blood sugar, can enjoy small portions each day.

The paleo diet allows for small portions of meat which is a massive draw for anyone who’s not interested in sticking to the vegan lifestyle.

However, the amount of meat intake is small to avoid high cholesterol problems.

Decrease Inflammation

The pegan diet is a good alternative for people looking to stop inflammation or have a more nourishing diet because it focuses primarily on nutrient-dense vegetables and whole foods.

It’s a great alternative for anyone leaving a typical American diet and is interested in becoming healthier and reducing their dependence on processed foods.

Cons

Nutrient Deficiency

Random elimination of massive groups of foods can cause nutrient deficiencies if those nutrients aren’t replaced.

Therefore, you might need a fundamental understanding of nutrition to effect the pegan diet safely.

Unnecessary Restrictions

Although this diet allows for more versatility than paleo or vegan diets, most restrictions unnecessarily limit healthy foods such as dairy, legumes, and whole grains.

Proponents of this diet cite elevated blood sugar and inflammation as the primary causes for eliminating these foods. But, of course, some people are allergic to dairy and gluten because they can cause inflammation.

Likewise, some people struggle to control their blood sugar levels when taking high-starch foods such as legumes or whole grains.

Final Thought

To sum it all up, the pegan diet comprises paleo and vegan values, although it advocates for some meat consumption.

So if you’re already a paleo or vegan and you’re interested in changing your diet, you can give this diet a go; you’ll adjust easily.

Foods to Eat On a Pegan DietFoods to limit on a Pegan Diet
Legumes and Whole GrainsDairy: Cheese, cow milk, and yogurt are strongly discouraged. However, dairy products made from goat or sheep milk are allowed in small portions.
Legumes: Black beans, chickpeas, green beans, lentils, and pinto beans.Food additives: Flavoring, preservatives, and synthetic coloring should be avoided.
Whole grains: Amaranth, black rice, millet, oats, teff, and quinoa.Gluten: All grains with gluten are strongly discouraged.
Non-Processed FatsGluten-free grains: Even grains that don't have gluten are not recommended. However, small portions of gluten-free whole grains are allowed occasionally.
Avocado and olives: You can use avocado and cold-pressed olive oil.Legumes: Most legumes are not recommended because they can increase blood sugar levels. However, non-starch legumes such as green beans and lentils are allowed.
Cocunut: You can take unrefined coconut oil.Refines oils: Refined oils such as canola, corn, palm, soybean, and sunflower oil are strongly discouraged because they contain some amount of cholesterol.
Nuts: You can take all nuts such as almonds and cashews except peanuts.
Omega-3s: Particularly those from low-mercury algae or fish.
Seeds: Take all seed oils except the processed ones.
Plants
Low glycemic fruits such as avocados, blackberries, blueberries, lemon, lime, and raspberries.
Vegetables: bell peppers, broccoli, butter lettuce, cauliflower, celery, collard greens, kale, and mushrooms.
Proteins
Grass-fed beef, lamb, pork, poultry, and whole eggs

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